Let Him That Is Without Sin Cast The First Stone

As we’ve reported before, we occasionally get emails from people who accuse us of all sorts of irresponsible behaviour.

The latest such email came in just a few days ago from Bob Steppelo, a Licensed Veterinary Technician, so in the interests of both using this post as a vehicle for replying to him (as he didn’t even have the courage to leave us a valid email address to reply to), and as a way to help demonstrate how narrow-minded and hypocritical many people are, we are reprinting the content of Bob’s email, as well as our comprehensive reply.

So, here is the email we received:


$139.95 for a product with no guarantees and no FDA approval or efficacy tests? Sounds like a winner. I especially love your misinformation about the parvo virus, and making veterinarians out to look like the devil, that was a nice touch.

Bob Steppelo, LVT


And here is our response:


Bob,

  1. How about the $500 to $12,000 per animal that our customers are being quoted by their vets (yes, these figures are not made up but come from customers we’ve worked with), and with an average success rate of only 50% (compared to our 90%)?

    One of our customers in New York took her cat, who had Feline Distemper (aka Feline Parvo) to her vet, and he tried to extort $12,000 from her even though the cat died under their treatment. No offer of any refund there, you’ll note!

    Against her vet’s “advice”, she did not choose to kill her other cats, but instead found us and managed to save them both, for a total cost of about $200. Why not read her unsolicited testimonial?

    So, which do you think is the better value here?

  2. How many vets do you know that offer any guarantee / promise of a refund with their Parvo treatment? (BTW, not one of our thousands of customers has been offered one, ever.)
  3. One of our customers told us his vet had never managed to save a dog from Parvo.

    How long do you think we’d be able to stay in business if our success rate was 0%, or even the still appallingly low 50%, which seems to be the average quoted by most vets?

    To put this in perspective, would you wager maybe half your annual take home salary on the spin of a roulette wheel in Vegas coming up red as opposed to black? Because those are the sort of odds and costs many vets are offering?

    (FYI, we’ve been selling these products since March 2007, have worked with thousands of customers and helped treat well over three thousand dogs, cats, and other mammals – all with about a 90% success rate.)

  4. How many vets offer 24 x 7 support to all of their customers? Is the vet you work for available at 3:00 am on a Sunday morning, for example? We suspect not.

    We offer this level of support because we are here to save sick animals and get them better – not stuff them full of chemicals that will, in many cases, necessitate return visits to “treat” the secondary problems caused (and, of course, this is part of that cash cow referred to earlier).

  5. How about the typical in-clinic Parvo test that routinely generates a false negative which frequently opens the door for the vet to coerce pet owners into vaccinating animals exposed/infected with Parvo?

    This scenario is so common – we encounter this multiple times a day. Since these animals are indeed infected, the vaccination is more than enough to send them over the top and almost guarantees they’ll develop full Parvo symptoms within a matter of days.

    Would you want your animals to be subjected to that type of experimentation?

    That’s gross negligence and that is precisely why we have little faith in those that put money before life.

    Vets (and human doctors) are in bed with legalized drug pushers. They get all sorts of deals, bonuses, and so forth to push the drug du jour on to unsuspecting patients. You will not find vets turning down business; they will not suggest alternatives to vaccinations, they will not tell their patients to stop filling their animals with harmful chemicals, synthetics, artificial additives, etc. because there are just too many residual income streams and they could never make that type of cash selling inexpensive herbals.

  6. Why are we seeing so many of our customers’ dogs developing full life-threatening Parvo symptoms within one or two days of being vaccinated?
  7. Why are we seeing more and more adult dogs (some as old as five years) who are up-to-date on all of their shots still getting Parvo?

    Could it possibly be that the vaccinations are increasingly less effective against the 2c strain that some vets still deny even exists?

  8. Why are so many vets still giving vaccinations every year (even though the AVMA recommends every three years), when the latest research shows that vaccinations are typically effective for at least seven years, if not longer, when the dangers of over-vaccination are now well-documented (e.g. a weakened immune system, chronic inflammation, cancer)?

    Actually, we know the answer: money, as vaccinations are a cash cow!

    According to one Canadian vet (who is starting to see the light about natural treatments), one dose of rabies vaccine costs the vet about 61 cents. The client is typically charged between $15 and $38, plus a $35 office visit. The mark-up on the vaccine alone is 2,400 percent to 6,200 percent – a mark-up equivalent to charging $217 for a loaf of bread.

    According to one estimate, removing the one-year rabies vaccination and consequential office visit for dogs alone would decrease the average small vet’s income from $87,000 to $25,000 – and this doesn’t include cats or other vaccinations.

    Still think the vet offers good value?

  9. Why do vets spread misinformation about Parvo to distraught pet owners?

    For example, many of our customers have been told by their vet that once the bloody diarrhea appears (which it does in almost every single one of the thousands of Parvo cases we’ve dealt with), they might as well murder their dog (yes, we know you call it euthanasia, but we believe in calling a spade a spade) because they have no chance of survival, even though this is patently untrue.

  10. Why do our customers have to leave their sick pets at the vet’s or animal hospital for up to a week, incurring massive fees, when at the end of all that, their animal is still sick? (Dogs tend to be eating by themselves and keeping the food down by the end of the second day of treatment when using the products we sell, which is not the experience of those customers of ours who chose to go down the vet route.)
  11. Why would a vet, who presumably has chosen that profession in order to save animals, recommend murder instead of giving pet owners a chance of their pet surviving if they would only open their minds and try these products?

    Murdering your pet gives them a 0% chance of survival (and sometimes for a cost that is greater than the cost of buying the products we sell), whereas administering a home Parvo treatment will, in most cases, give the animal a second lease of life and save the family from having to make that gut-wrenching decision to kill their dog – a decision which we know haunts some pet owners for years to come, as they will always wonder “what if?”

  12. Why do so many vets recommend giving products such as Pedialyte, Gatorade, chicken and rice to dogs with Parvo when these can cause additional and avoidable problems (e.g. excessive vomiting, the risk of bacterial infection by agents such as campylobacter, the risk of a fatal blockage)?
  13. Why would so many people send us unsolicited testimonialsand case studies if these products weren’t effective?

Until you have tried these products yourself, which you clearly have not done, then please leave us to get on with our mission of saving sick pets from viruses such as Canine Parvo and Feline Distemper, instead of having to spend our valuable time replying to your highly uninformed opinions, as that is all they are.


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2 Responses to “Let Him That Is Without Sin Cast The First Stone”

  1. Rachel says:

    Love this reply to an email that is like you say highly uninformed. I am one of those people that experienced the loss of my dog from parvo by going down the vet route and that cost us $1500 for us to just go ahead and lose him. The next 2 dogs we got did not get parvo which was highly likely to happen because we would have still had the virus on our property as it can last for years without going. However we decided to use the parvo buster herbals on both of them with great success for a cost of approximately $180 for both the dogs. They are both healthy still and we have had one of them for 2 years and the other for a year. So I am an avid fan of these herbal products they saved us a lot of heartache of going through another dog dying of parvo which is such a horrific illness that I never would want anyone to ever have to experience. In addition I have always found support from Parvo buster that is unrivalled by vets, they are definitely passionate about helping animals.
    Thanks so much!
    Rachel Wright

  2. Steve Stevenson says:

    I just wanted to say thanks! I was clicking around on some different forums when I found your site. After checking out your website I’ve come up with some ideas for my website. I just thought I’d let you know